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to publicly call on assad to step down because of the horrific violence being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan has played a leading role in trying to begin a political transition toward a new government. we're working together to strengthen a credible syrian opposition. we share jordan's concerns about violence spilling across the borders. so i want to take this opportunity to make it clear the united states is committed to the security of jordan, which is backed by our strong alliance. as has been mentioned during this crisis the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of so many refugees inevitably is showing. every day -- to neighbors far from home, but this is a heavy burden. and the international community needs to step up to make sure that they are helping to shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped people here in jordan. and today i'm announcing that my administration will work with congress to provide jorda
leader to publicly call on assad to step down because of the horrific violence that was being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan has played a leading role in trying to begin a political transition toward a new government. while working together to strengthen a credible, syrian opposition. we share jordan's concerns about violence spilling across the border. so i want to take this opportunity to make it clear the united states is committed to the security of jordan. which is backed by our strong alliance. as has been mentioned during this crisis, the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of so many refugees inevitably is showing. every day -- [ inaudible ] >> to neighbors far from home, but this is a heavy burden. and international community needs to step up to make sure that they are helping to shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are already the single largest donor of humanitarian assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped people here in jordan. and today i'm announcing that my administration will
bashar assad eventually leaves there is a risk extremists will take over. >> they thrive in failed states. they thrive in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to actually building things but they are very good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functioning. >> shepard: and no matter how this unfolds, the president says the outcome in syria is not going to be ideal our chief white house correspondent traveling with live in amman jordan. the president is getting more pressure to use military in syria. >> he he is the president wept out and vowed that he would rid asyria of all the extremist still left there a sign that he is ready to kill more people. is he digging in even deeper president obama is getting pressure no-fly zone. come up with surgical air strikes. something to stop the killing. but the president today said at a news conference you have to be very careful with u.s. power. >> what your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily. and, you know, i think it's fair to say that the united states often finds its
's thinking on what to do about syria, how the united states can help move to the post-assad period. >> let me ask you quickly about this speech, because it's coming up in about 40 minutes. obviously, the relationship, if you look at the polls between the president and the israeli people, has been strained as well. here's what a university professor wrote in "the daily beast" this morning. mr. obama will be talking to young people who are neither listless cynics nor disaffected sofa-plit koes. many of them have marched in demonstrations and took active part in protest rallies. our record of effective activism is by comparison to every other recent social movement, stellar. is this an important speech for him there? if so, what should his message be? >> well, it is an important speech. he has about a 10% approval rating in israel. that will undoubtedly tick up. but this is part of the president's style. you remember in 2009 he spoke at cairo university. he's made a choice here. he's not going to speak government to government. he's going to move beyond that dialogue to talk directly to the isra
administration to use patriot missiles to degrade the assad regime's air power and the chair and ranking members of the house intelligence committee have introduced a bill calling for the administration to arm syrian rebels. asked today about whether the united states would provide a more aggressive military response to the syrian crisis, the president would only say this. >> the united states often finds itself in a situation where if it goes in militarily then it's criticized for going in militarily. and if it doesn't go in militarily then people say why aren't you doing something militarily, and, you know, my response at this stage is to make sure that what we do contributes to bringing an end to the bloodshed as quickly as possible. >> joining me now is nbc's peteral exandriny. >> the president wraps up his four-day visit to the middle east tomorrow. with renewed pressure to handle the crisis in syria, a nation he's not visiting, what is the effect of this trip been on that issue, do you think? >> reporter: well, i think we've got a pretty good sense of it as i was there in the news conferen
. >>> and now syria. the assad regime and rebel forces are accusing one another of using chemical weapons. syrian state media reported that rebel forces launched a chemical attack killing at least two dozen people, injuring more than 100 people. rebels deny that charge vehemently and accuse regime forces of shelling a town near damascus with chemical rockets. our senior international reporter is in amman, jordan, this morning. i know there are a lot of questions to substantiating the claims. what do we know so far? >> reporter: most of the information is coming from syrian state tv. and that's claiming that at least 25 people were killed in some kind of an attack in a village. scores of people wounded. and then syrian state tv playing interviews with some of the alleged victims who were saying that they smelled chlorine and almost all aping the same message, is this the freedom that the free syrian army rebels want? so some of those statements do come out to be a little suspect. neither side has been entirely truthful when it comes to the information and media war over syria. now very qui
are being used in syria by the assad regime or by rebel groups? what do you think? >> i don't know but chairman rogers, highly respected chairman of the intelligence committee has access to information that very select leaders have in this country. so when he is drawing a conclusion it is likely it is probable, i think we have to take him at his word. i believe also before our government would take any action, they would have to actually confirm that chemical weapons were used. heather: you know syrian president assad, he released some pictures, he released some video. i have, i believe we have some of that, that he says proves that rebel forces used chemical weapons on this attack. he alleges it happened on march 19th in aleppo. just from you viewing this video, taking a look at these pictures, can you yourself tell, i mean, you can't tell if chemical weapons were in fact used here but president assad says this is proof. >> well certainly doctors after a period of time would be able to determine that to be sure. whether we could get accurate information from assad's medical system
the ancient city of petra. ramp up criticism of syrian president bashar assad. >> ed henry is live this morning in amman jordan with the very latest. good morning, ed. >> good toe sue i goose, interesting. because as you know you have got syria on jordan's northern border. and there are hundreds of thousands of refugees spilled out because of that ongoing civil war. all that strife. the violence, president assad killing his own people. they are winding up here in jordan. many of them and there is a lot of pressure building. damaging his economy big time pressure on president obama at home all around the world to intervene in some way. carl levin saying saying there should be some kind of surgical air strike. maybe the president should help set up a no-fly zone around syria to pressure assad. the bottom line is the president at a news conference here yesterday said he feels like it's a situation where is he damned if he does, damned if he doesn't. take a listen. >> your question may be suggesting is why haven't we simply gone in militarily? and, you know, i think it's fair to say th
who called for active approach to take out president bashar assad, from no-fly zone to airstrike. >> it's tragic. it's heart-breaking. the sight of children and women being slaughtered that we have seen so much i think has to compel all of us to say what more can we do? >> king abdullah is also under pressure. since a refugee camp alone is now the fifth largest city in jordan. there is also fear extremists will spread chemical weapons from syria to jordan and israel. abdullah resisted any foreign military intervention and today visibly winced as a reporter asked if it would provide asylum. the president tid penal is $200 million more in u.s. taxpayer assistance to jordan for refugee and scored diplomatic victory by getting israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu to patch things up by phone with his turkish counterpart after a bitter spat that could have hendered u.s. efforts to get turkey's help on syria. the president visited the church of the nativity in bethlehem and continued outreach to the people. although a stop at the holocaust museum in jerusalem may have provided a ch
. to the kingdom of jordon he announced an additional $2 million of u.s. aid. >> i am confident assad will go. it's not a question of if, it's when. >> asked how that will happen, he struck a defensive note. >> it's fair to say that the united states often finds itself in a situation where it goes in military it is criticized and if it doesn't then people say, why don't you go in militarily? >> reporter: former allies whose three year stand off had ripples across the region. >> timing was good for that conversation to take place. i discussed it with prime minister netanyahu and pwoeftbo us agreed the moment was right, and fortunately they were able to begin the process of rebuilding the relations between two important countries in the region. >> reporter: concerning back to syria, jordon's king abdullah offered assad asylum in jordon, but when asked if that offer still stands, he did not renew the pledge. >>> in other news, a 10-year-old boy is dead this morning. one other person clinging to live after a display sign fell on them in an airport in birmingham, alabama. the report was the sign of ar
on assad to step down because of the horrific violence being inflicted on the syrian people. jordan took a leading role in the political transition to a more stable government. we are looking at strengthening the syrian opposition. we share concerns about violence spilling across the borders. i want to make it clear. the united states is committed to the security of jordan, which is backed by our strong alliance. the jordanian people have displayed extraordinary generosity, but the strains of some many refugees inevitably is showing. every day, they are far from home, but this is a heavy burden. the international community needs to step up and help shoulder this burden. the united states will certainly do our part. we are these single largest donor of assistance to the syrian people. some of this has helped jordan, and i have been announcing that my administration will provide jordan with an additional $200 million in budget support as it cares for syrian refugees and jordanian communities affected by this crisis. this will mean more assistance with basic services including education for
in syria. we're all talking about the emphasis is on helping the resistance against president assad reach victory. obama keeps saying it's not matter of if but when president assad leaves. that's not really so sure. looking at the what's happening on the ground, the breakup of syria is more likely rather than a clear victory of one side winning or losing and president assad leaving the country altogether. so it's really a matter of the next step. what happens after whatever happens in syria. the threat is to the region. the countries on the borders of syria. turkey has its problems. jordan could well have its problems very soon. lebanon. so it's a very -- it's a situation that's very volatile. syria has been imploding and the fear, of course, is that it will explode. america's options -- what it needs to do is help the region formulate some kind of way of dealing with the problem inside syria. american troops on the ground very unlikely, but, of course, there are already special forces, american special forces, british special forces, and i believe french special forces inside jordan trai
civil war, to the north. the king was the first arab leader to call on bashar al- assad to go, and is cooperating with the u.s. and others to make that happen. jordan reportedly hosts u.s. and other special forces training the ragtag syrian rebels. but the pressures come from a flood of syrian refugees. some 460,000 now, housed in squalid refugee camps, and the numbers keep growing. >> how are you going to turn back women, children and the wounded? this is something that we just can't do. it's not the jordanian way. the problem is obviously the burden it's having on jordan. we've tried to quantify it as much as possible. the latest figure says it's going to cost roughly $550 million a year. not only is that a problem, but it's going to be a tremendous strain, obviously, on infrastructure, and it's creating social problems and security problems. >> warner: there are strains on jordan too from the fact an estimated half of all jordanians are palestinians from the west bank. so king abdullah has long urged the u.s. to get re-engaged in trying to bring peace between israelis and p
. at the same time, both president obama and king abdullah have called for president assad to accept down and have made it clear that they don't see much of a future for him in running that country. >> always good to see you. thanks so much. >> today's tweet of the day has to do with march madness. in case you didn't hear, 14th seed harvard earned its first ever ncaa victory last night. so today this is what the harvard lampoon tweeted -- america, we are sorry for messing up your brackets and your financial system and everything else. seed harvard earned its first >>> hard to believe it's been ten years since the shock and au campaign that laufrgesed the iraq war. i was on the air as it was all unfolding. this clip is from the morning after the war began. >> let's get you up to date on what is happening. it started at 9:30 eastern time last night when president bush gave the order and attacks were made against leadership targets, saddam hussein in a bunker around baghdad. and since then, a lot of activity for those troops massed along the iraq kuwaiti border. they have gotten some scares
is having some strategic distress over, you know, the, you know, the king of the assad regime. more relaxed about that just as more relaxed about egypt and in syria i find a much more limited sort of agenda than i would have thought going in much, instead of believing the u.s. will somehow reorder the middle east to israel's liking i find this is sober kind of a summit, what is doable and what is not doable. a lot of stuff about the new israeli government which i'm happy to discuss in the q&a. this gives you a bit of a sense how you see things. thank you all very much. >> thank you, dave. very good. turn to mike singh. >> thanks a lot, rob. good to be doing this and it's, good to be on this panel with my colleagues. one of the great strengths about the washington institute and one of the things which makes it so nice to work here is to have colleagues like david and dennis and ambassador jeffrey who are here and great source of wisdom on this topic. i should also start by apologizing to our viewers who have hd screens who had to watch me eat lunch at the beginning. one of the downsides of t
the conflict ends and assuming that assad steps aside. however, translating that political imperative into discreet military steps and actions is actually quite difficult. in has been a lot of talk. john mccain has talked repeatedly over the last two years about establishing a no-fly zone. that involves an act of war that brings the united states as a combatant into the syrian civil war. it may well become necessary but it is not a step that you must take lightly. somebody else in congress has suggested, insert american forces to guard the chemical weapons sites. i mean, one of the driving factors in military action is forced protection. how are you going to protect these discreet elements? we think we can define it politically as a narrow mission but in fact, the net result is bringing the united states as a full combatant into this conflict. >> and do we even know where all the sites are at this point? >> the united states knows where the sites are, yes. the united states is saying we're monitoring these situations and we have confidence that the syrians still have positive control
war. the assad regime and rebel forces accusing each other of chemical war fair, but u.s. military officials tell cnn their intelligence suggests neither side used those weapons. >>> 183 air traffic control towers on the chopping block. today we learn which ones the faa will shut down. some of the towers are practically brand new. blame the four spending cuts for all of this. the towers handle low to moderate amounts of air traffic and use mostly contract workers as well. >> a combination of technical and communications breakdowns are blamed for the power loss at the super bowl. the power caused a more than half-hour delay between the baltimore ravens and san francisco 49ers. according to an independent analysis, a design defect in a recently installed relay device caused the power to trip. they had trouble reaching the manufacturer to solve the problem. >> hopefully it won't happen again. >>> sow, how is that bracket holding up for you? the first full day of the ncaa tournament delivering the first huge upset. 14th seed harvard pulling off a stunner in salt lake city new york knoc
and it will be very critical that if there are chemical weapons being used by the assad regime president obama responds accordingly. that is another red line he is drawing. that is red line irisraelies will be watching and iranians. is this president serious about committing to red lines and honoring the red lines. uma: quickly with obama speaking to young people in israel, that was very interesting strategy on his part because he knows he often does well in those kind of settings, at that type of theater backdrop. >> i think that's right. president obama shown in the u.s. context he is he is brilliant at grassroots activism and getting support of the grassroots. he tried to go over the head of prime minister netanyahu. he tried to appeal to the grassroots to build political support, get beyond a 10% approval rating. he will need that and support of israeli people if he will is for israelies to take significant risks for peace with respect to the palestinians. uma: you used that word over, risk, over and over again. >> there is risk on israeli borders. missiles from the north. missiles from th
on back channels in moscow to get russia and vladimir putin to realize that assad is not around forever and at some point it's time to jump ship and support who is there in the future. my understanding is that doesn't seem to have pushed the russians at all. the russians are still firmly backing assad and don't think this is the time to switch. the alternatives in terms of arming the rebels is really all that the west is now looking at but they still have these reservations that if you give arms to elements of the rebels, how do you know that they don't end up in the hands of the extremis extremists? if america is going to dictate what happens in the future in syria, it needs to have a place at the table. it needs to be able to be part of the discussion and i suspect that will eventually lead to america taking part with a coalition in giving small arms to syrian rebels. >> ron, it's fascinating, that the president goes to israel without a peace plan in his back pocket or without any hopes of a peace plan in his back pocket. almost unprecedented. does this tell us how important iran is n
, a major issue obama said it's a game changer if assad uses chemical weapons and the u.s. has to be very careful they have accurate information on that. the pressure they have militarily if they do. >> people are still dying every day. chemical weapons or no. >> that's what we get into the debate, what kind of munitions were used. we treat chemical weapons that are used and people in syria who are killed probably might not see such a difference. if we should intervene no matter what. >> we'll continue this trip on "starting point." >>> ready for blackberry. long awaited launch. >> have you noted that the winter weather is sticking around a long time? punxsutawney phil could be in serious trouble for the early spring prediction. a lawyer is suing the groundhog. a lawyer. who passed the bar. on "starting point." back in a moment. nnouncer ] a classic macaroni & cheese from stouffer's starts with freshly-made pasta, and 100% real cheddar cheese. but what makes stouffer's mac n' cheese best of all. that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. made with care for you or your family. to book t
's why i'm quite skeptical about it right now. >>brian: what's the worst scenario? that assad is using it as the government in charge or that the rebels have it? and we know inside the rebel organization, if you can call it that, are muslim extremists? >> absolutely. they're both bad because once one uses it, the other side will use it. the real danger is hezbollah gets it and would use it on israel. that's the great fear that i have. >>brian: general, how do you know all this stuff about agents? was that a focus of yours? >> i used to be in command of a unit that used to have that mission before we signed the chemical weapons treaty. i'm intimately familiar with using them, storing them, putting them on airplanes. this is with fighters we had them. and that is a very difficult area to work on. and i had a great deal of experience with that. of course we no longer use them and it's no longer in our inventory. >>brian: we know the president said that's a red line. we think we know where this stuff is housed. can we go with an airstrike, blow it up and not poison the surrounding populati
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

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